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5 ways to avoid alienating new hires at your organization

onboardingFor every organization, a wise strategy is to place an emphasis on employee retention and productivity with your valued longtime staff members. After all, it’s common for people to become disengaged with their work after they’ve been at it for a while, so talent managers need to do what they can to keep their experienced workers engaged and productive.

But here’s what you might not realize – it’s just as important to take the necessary steps to engage and retain new employees. An equally big problem is that many companies alienate their new employees by mishandling the beginning of their tenure. Even the very first day can be problematic if it doesn’t go well.

There’s a great deal of research to support the idea that engaging new hires is important. For example, Bersin by Deloitte recently revealed survey data showing that 25 percent of new employees leave within one year of being hired. These departures cost businesses an average of over $10,500 per lost employee. It’s expensive to recruit, hire and train a replacement every time somebody leaves.

At Ceridian, we believe employers should address this problem by working harder to make their new people feel comfortable. Eric Schuster, vice president of Dayforce Product Management at Ceridian, stated in a company release that retention begins with an employee’s very first day, so it’s important to get a healthy start.

“New hires must feel valued, and an organization cannot do this if their onboarding process isn’t organized,” Schuster explained. “Human capital management software programs like Ceridian Dayforce HCM streamline the onboarding process by outlining what new hires need to do before their first day of work, on their first day and during their first week.”

It’s good to be aware of new employees’ pet peeves. If you know what habits alienate new people, you can prepare your company well to avoid them. Here are five valuable tidbits of advice:

Engage after the offer
One way to scare off a new employee is to make the hire, then go silent. New staff members appreciate having employers who are willing to communicate with them well throughout the onboarding process.

Be organized from day one
A first day that’s scattered and disorganized can be a major turnoff. Make sure that your employees have an orderly, understandable onboarding process that guides them clearly through the first few weeks.

Offer hands-on training
New employees can get bored if their first day consists of a lot of standing around, unsure of what to do next. If you’re willing to be hands-on and show your staff members the ropes, that can help.

Explain all the lingo
No one likes getting lost in a massive bowl of “acronym soup.” Lots of confusing abbreviations and pieces of jargon can be off-putting for a new employee who doesn’t understand them. Take the time to spell everything out and explain it carefully to new employees.

Nurture interpersonal connections
People like to make connections when they first enter the workplace. Not just personal friendships, but also business relationships, such as the one between mentor and mentee. Give people a chance to mingle and potentially bond.

Learn more about Dayforce Recruiting and how it provides a simplified and streamlined recruiting process for candidates, hiring managers and administrators.

Join us for one of our related conference sessions at INSIGHTS 2015 in Las Vegas.

  • Customer Presentation: Palace Entertainment – How to Optimize Dayforce
    Recruiting to Provide Value to Your Organization,  July 15, 10:45 am – 12:15 pm (Room: Ironwood 2)
  • Social Job Distribution with Dayforce Recruiting, July 15, 1:30 pm – 2:15 pm (Room: Ironwood 2)
  • Dayforce HCM – Recruiting Management, July 15, 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm (Room: Juniper 3)
  • Dayforce HCM – Recruiting Management, July 16, 9:30 am – 11:00 am (Room: Juniper 3)
  • Dayforce HCM – Creating Recruiting Job Applications, July 16, 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm (Room: Juniper 4)
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